Back to the Pumpkin Patch

Tony and I finally brought Matilda to our favorite pumpkin patch, Jucker Farm.  We had first visited a few years ago and loved it.  It was now time to introduce Matilda to Jucker Farm and to all that is involved with my favorite holiday, Halloween.

pumpkin patch

pumpkin patch

pumpkin patch

It’s fairly easy to get to Jucker Farm by train, and before we knew it, we had arrived.  It is just like any pumpkin patch in the USA, and in some ways is even better.  Matilda is still a bit too young to understand, but that didn’t stop us from maximizing cute photo ops and enjoying the day.

pumpkin patch

pumpkin patch

Just as I remembered, the pumpkin patch had great pumpkin beer, sausage and decorations.  They crafted many statues out pumpkins, including a large squirrel and deer.  The farm is extremely child friendly as well, with pumpkin carving and a petting zoo.

pumpkin patch

pumpkin patch

We spent our time enjoying the food and drink and taking photos.  I also purchased a few pumpkins to decorate for Halloween.  I’ve spent a lot of time collecting decoration ideas on Pinterest and I am almost ready to showcase all of my pumpkins.

pumpkin patch

What? I can’t hear you!

I can’t wait for next year when Matilda is a little older.  We can start a new Halloween tradition with our little girl.

A Day at the Pumpkin Patch

This weekend my friends and I did something very American – we visited a pumpkin patch in preparation for Halloween.  Not only is this tradition very American, but it’s also very Mid-West.  I have extremely fond childhood memories of the month of October.  My father would take my siblings and I to pick out the perfect pumpkin, and we would spend hours coloring, painting and carving.  My favorite was always cleaning out the “guts” as we called it – the slimy seeds covered in stringy pumpkin flesh.  I loved feeling the seeds squirt out from in between my knuckles when I squeezed hard enough.

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My dad used to also always buy some of the ugliest smaller gourds you could find – warty green things, cracked yellow ones – whatever he could get his hands on.  He would then use these to decorate his own pumpkin and would joke the large gourd used as a nose was actually his own nose.

Jucker Farm was about a 25 minute train ride away from Zurich and then another 20 minute walk.  It was a perfect, crisp fall day, slightly overcast, and as soon as we saw the fields of pumpkins, our excitement grew.  There were a variety of offerings at the farm, such as restaurants, sausage roasting, pumpkin jam and pumpkin prosecco to be had.  There was also a petting zoo and maze, delicious smelling roasted pumpkin seeds in all flavors, and very interesting pumpkin sculptures, all representing flight.  I think I liked the airplane the most given that you could make out the Swiss flag on the wing.

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After eating and drinking, we each picked out our own pumpkin and headed back to a friends to carve and eat chili.  Some of our friends who were from Europe had never done this before so watching them made it all the most exciting for me.  I ended up carving something simple because at that point the pumpkin prosecco had gone a bit to my head and I didn’t trust myself much with sharp objects.  I then helped my friend prep the seeds for roasting and called it a night.

Photo thanks to Katie!

Photo thanks to Katie!

I was so thankful for this opportunity because it really made me feel like I was home.  I didn’t have to give up some of my favorite holiday traditions just because I was living on another continent.  Jucker Farm already has my name all over it and I can’t wait to go back next year.

Happy Halloween everyone!